Welcome to the Skeptics in the Pub, Nottingham

For the promotion of science, reason and critical thinking

We get together on a monthly basis to have a relaxed, enjoyable and social evening while listening to talks given on a wide range of topics. 

The events are free, though we do ask for a £3 donation to cover the speakers expenses and other costs.

All upcoming events are listed below and on the right of this page.

Our venue is the first floor function room of the Canalhouse pub.

Who can attend? 

The meetings are open to all, whatever your beliefs and views, so please come along. We are a friendly bunch and everyone is welcome.

As the Canalhouse room is a private function room, under 18s are allowed to attend our events. However, under 18s must be accompanied by an adult when in the public downstairs bar.

Disabled access

The Canalhouse has a service lift which we can used to provide disabled access to the first floor function room. There is also a disabled toilet on the same floor.

Please let us know if you're coming to an event and require disabled access. We will make arrangements with the bar staff to bring you to the function room.

Keep in touch

Subscribe to the mailing list (on the right of this page) to be notified about upcoming events.

You can join the Nottingham Skeptics Facebook group here, and will receive an invite to each event.

We are also on Google+.

Follow @Notts_Skeptics to keep up to date on up coming meetings and other information.

 

Mark Stevenson

When?
Tuesday, August 1 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Mark Stevenson

What's the talk about?

Our systems are failing. Old models – for education, healthcare and government, food production, energy supply – are creaking under the weight of modern challenges. As the world’s population heads towards 10 billion, it’s clear we need new approaches. Futurologist Mark Stevenson sets out to find them, across four continents.

From Brazilian favelas to high tech Boston, from rural India to a shed inventor in England’s home counties, We Do Things Differently travels the world to find the advance guard re-imagining our future. At each stop, he meets innovators who have already succeeded in challenging the status quo, pioneering new ways to make our world more sustainable, equitable and humane.

Mark has also written for The Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, Intelligent Life, The Irish Times, The Irish Independent, The Daily Telegraph, and The New Statesman. His key skill is an ability to take complex or abstract concepts and make them understandable by non-specialists without trivialising the subject matter.

Mark is also an occasional comedy writer. His work has been performed on Radio 4 and his play (co-written with Jack Milner) Octopus Soup comes to London in January 2018.

Mark also wrote An Optimists tour of the Future and came and spoke to NSITP back in September 2011.

An exploration of love typologies

Maria Kontogianni

When?
Tuesday, September 5 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Maria Kontogianni

What's the talk about?

Maria is a social psychologist and some of her research interests lie within Intimate Relationships, Relationship Conflict, Sexuality, LGBT psychology Masculinity and Femininity. 
 
She will talk about why we seek out partners and "love typologies".
 
Maria is a Principal Lecturer in Psychology and she leads on Staff development and staff well-being.. She teaches on several undergraduate modules, including Social and Lifespan Developmental Psychology, Gender Body Image and Identity, The Psychology of Religion and the Psychology of Sex.

Jamie Bartlett

When?
Tuesday, October 3 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Jamie Bartlett

What's the talk about?

Jamie Bartlett will talk about his new book Radicals, which is an exploration of the individuals, groups and movements rejecting the way we live now, and are attempting to find alternatives.
He will take us inside the strange and exciting worlds of the innovators, disruptors, idealists and extremists who think society is broken, and believe they know how. From dawn raids into open mines to the darkest recesses of the internet, Radicals introduces us to some of the most interesting and important movements today: the US Transhumanist Party, far-right groups seeking to close the borders, militant environmentalists striving to save the planet's natural reserves by any means possible, libertarian movements founding new countries, autonomous cooperatives in self-sustaining micro-societies, and psychedelic pioneers attempting to heal society with the help of powerful hallucinogens.
He will discuss the prospects for these new political movements, why they are growing now, and whether there is anything the mainstream can learn from them. 

Jamie Bartlett is the Director of the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media at the think-tank Demos, where he specialises in online social movements and the impact of technology on society. He is also author of the best selling book The Dark Net and a regular commentator on national and international media outlets.

Andrew Copson

When?
Tuesday, October 10 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Andrew Copson

What's the talk about?

Secularism, the belief that religion should not be part of the affairs of the state or part of public education, is an increasingly hot topic in global public, political, and religious debates. In his new book, Secularism: politics, religion, and freedom (OUP), Andrew Copson tells the story of secularism, discussing secular republics and the challenges they can face from resurgent religious identity politics.

Andrew Copson is the Chief Executive of the British Humanist Association, where he was previously Director of Education and Public Affairs; President of the International Humanist and Ethical Union; and a former Director of the European Humanist Federation. In these capacities he is one of the most experienced and prolific advocates of secularism, its study, and its implementation. For over a decade he has carried out a range of national and international practical secularist policy work and spoken internationally on secularism. He has been an associate of the Centre for Law and Religion and the University of Cardiff since 2008 and represented the secularist point of view on public or other bodies such as the Foreign Office's Advisory Panel on Freedom of Religion or Belief and the Woolf Institute's Commission on Religion and Belief in British Public Life. He co-edited The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook on Humanism (Wiley-Blackwell, 2015), with A C Grayling.

Literally the Best Magician

When?
Wednesday, November 1 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
David Alnwick

What's the talk about?

#Dave - Literally the Best Magician

Dr Fiona MacCallum

When?
Tuesday, December 5 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Dr Fiona MacCallum

What's the talk about?

What does the modern family look like? Technology has led to the creation of families that were not previously possible; a woman can become pregnant with, and give birth to, a child who is not genetically related to her. Parents don’t have to be in a female-male couple but can be with a same-sex partner or going it alone. Many assumptions are made about the best situation for children but what is actually known about the psychological effects of being raised in a “non-traditional” family? I’ll discuss research which investigates different family types and asks questions such as does it matter if a child has two mums or two dads? What do parents tell their children about how they were conceived? And when it comes to family relationships, is “blood” really thicker than water?


Fiona MacCallum is a developmental psychologist with a particular interest in parent-child relationships and their influence on children’s social and emotional wellbeing. She began to research the psychology of new family forms in 1996, and has specialised in the study of non-genetic families. Fiona is an Associate Professor in Psychology at the University of Warwick
 

The Hidden Story of the Hopes, Fears and Desires of a Nation

James Wright

When?
Tuesday, January 9 2018 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
James Wright

What's the talk about?

Modern graffiti is often seen as transgressive and moronic. However, look closely in the light of a torch at the walls of our historic buildings, trees, caves and rockfaces and you will see a world of graffiti left that illuminates the psychology of our ancestors. The study of historic graffiti enables us to hear the lost voices of ordinary individuals through their images of daisywheels, ships sailing across the walls, knights drawing their swords, demons stalking the stonework and every animal imaginable….

James Wright is an archaeologist, lecturer and author currently based at the University of Nottingham. With over twenty years of professional experience, he has published two books plus a string of popular and academic articles based on extensive research of the British Mediaeval and Early Modern periods. He makes regular appearances for the BBC and has acted as an archaeological consultant for Channel 4’s Time Team.

Dr Nick Hawes

When?
Tuesday, February 6 2018 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Dr Nick Hawes

What's the talk about?

It’s inevitable, isn't it? One day robots will take over the world, either through some kind of violent rebellion, or through the back door -- by taking all our jobs. Aren't we throwing caution to the wind by ignoring this threat? Well, by explaining some of the basic principles behind artificial intelligence and robotics, I'm going to try to convince you that all those science fiction writers are wrong, and whilst robots will have a large part to play in our future, you don't need to worry about the effect they'll have on our existence.

Nick Hawes is a Reader in Autonomous Intelligent Robotics in the School of Computer Science at the University of Birmingham. His research is in the application of Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques to create intelligent, autonomous robots that can work with or for humans. He is a passionate believer in public engagement with AI and robotics and was selected to give the Lord Kelvin Award Lecture at the 2013 British Science Festival.

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