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Andrew Copson

When?
Tuesday, October 10 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Andrew Copson

What's the talk about?

If you are on Facebook, please RSVP so that we can estimate how many people will be attending.

Secularism, the belief that religion should not be part of the affairs of the state or part of public education, is an increasingly hot topic in global public, political, and religious debates. In his new book, Secularism: politics, religion, and freedom (OUP), Andrew Copson tells the story of secularism, discussing secular republics and the challenges they can face from resurgent religious identity politics.

Five Leaves Bookshop will be selling Andrew's book at the event.

Andrew Copson is the Chief Executive of the British Humanist Association, where he was previously Director of Education and Public Affairs; President of the International Humanist and Ethical Union; and a former Director of the European Humanist Federation. In these capacities he is one of the most experienced and prolific advocates of secularism, its study, and its implementation. For over a decade he has carried out a range of national and international practical secularist policy work and spoken internationally on secularism. He has been an associate of the Centre for Law and Religion and the University of Cardiff since 2008 and represented the secularist point of view on public or other bodies such as the Foreign Office's Advisory Panel on Freedom of Religion or Belief and the Woolf Institute's Commission on Religion and Belief in British Public Life. He co-edited The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook on Humanism (Wiley-Blackwell, 2015), with A C Grayling.

Jamie Bartlett

When?
Tuesday, October 3 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Jamie Bartlett

What's the talk about?

Jamie Bartlett will talk about his new book Radicals, which is an exploration of the individuals, groups and movements rejecting the way we live now, and are attempting to find alternatives.
He will take us inside the strange and exciting worlds of the innovators, disruptors, idealists and extremists who think society is broken, and believe they know how. From dawn raids into open mines to the darkest recesses of the internet, Radicals introduces us to some of the most interesting and important movements today: the US Transhumanist Party, far-right groups seeking to close the borders, militant environmentalists striving to save the planet's natural reserves by any means possible, libertarian movements founding new countries, autonomous cooperatives in self-sustaining micro-societies, and psychedelic pioneers attempting to heal society with the help of powerful hallucinogens.
He will discuss the prospects for these new political movements, why they are growing now, and whether there is anything the mainstream can learn from them. 

Jamie Bartlett is the Director of the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media at the think-tank Demos, where he specialises in online social movements and the impact of technology on society. He is also author of the best selling book The Dark Net and a regular commentator on national and international media outlets.

An exploration of love typologies

Maria Kontogianni

When?
Tuesday, September 5 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Maria Kontogianni

What's the talk about?

Maria is a social psychologist and some of her research interests lie within Intimate Relationships, Relationship Conflict, Sexuality, LGBT psychology Masculinity and Femininity. 
 
She will talk about why we seek out partners and "love typologies".
 
Maria is a Principal Lecturer in Psychology and she leads on Staff development and staff well-being.. She teaches on several undergraduate modules, including Social and Lifespan Developmental Psychology, Gender Body Image and Identity, The Psychology of Religion and the Psychology of Sex.

Mark Stevenson

When?
Tuesday, August 1 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Mark Stevenson

What's the talk about?

Our systems are failing. Old models – for education, healthcare and government, food production, energy supply – are creaking under the weight of modern challenges. As the world’s population heads towards 10 billion, it’s clear we need new approaches. Futurologist Mark Stevenson sets out to find them, across four continents.

From Brazilian favelas to high tech Boston, from rural India to a shed inventor in England’s home counties, We Do Things Differently travels the world to find the advance guard re-imagining our future. At each stop, he meets innovators who have already succeeded in challenging the status quo, pioneering new ways to make our world more sustainable, equitable and humane.

Mark has also written for The Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, Intelligent Life, The Irish Times, The Irish Independent, The Daily Telegraph, and The New Statesman. His key skill is an ability to take complex or abstract concepts and make them understandable by non-specialists without trivialising the subject matter.

Mark is also an occasional comedy writer. His work has been performed on Radio 4 and his play (co-written with Jack Milner) Octopus Soup comes to London in January 2018.

Mark also wrote An Optimists tour of the Future and came and spoke to NSITP back in September 2011.

Jenny Josephs

When?
Tuesday, July 4 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Jenny Josephs

What's the talk about?

After completing a PhD in Visual Cognition at the University of Southampton, Jenny changed course and started The Bug Shack - a business promoting and selling edible insects. Jenny is a regular speaker at Skeptics events and science festivals and is also involved in academic research.

By 2050 the global population will reach 9 billion and this will put ever increasing pressure on food and environmental resources. It will be a challenge to ensure global food security without further damaging the environment with intensified farming practices.

One UN backed solution is to focus on alternative sources of protein, such as insects for food and animal feed. About 2 billion of us already include insects in our diets, though it is still a growing trend in the west.

Insects are described as having a variety of different flavours, from mushroomy to pistachio or pork crackling. They are comparable to beef in protein and contain beneficial nutrients like iron and calcium. Their environmental impact is also minimal, requiring far less water and feed than cattle, and releasing fewer emissions.

During this talk, Jenny will explain how insects might replace some of the meat in our diets and also give some tips on how to cook them. You will be invited to sample some tasty bug snacks after the talk!

Leah Fitzsimmons

When?
Tuesday, June 6 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Leah Fitzsimmons

What's the talk about?

Every day, we hear claims about what is good for our health, bad for the environment, how to improve education, cut crime, and treat disease. Some are based on reliable evidence and scientific rigour. Many are not.  These claims can’t be regulated; every time one is debunked another pops up – like a game of whack-a-mole. So how can we make companies, politicians, commentators and official bodies accountable for the claims they make? If they want us to vote for them, believe them, or buy their products, then we should ask them for evidence, as consumers, patients, voters and citizens.

Sense About Science’s Ask for Evidence campaign has seen people ask a retail chain for the evidence behind its MRSA resistant pyjamas; ask a juice bar for the evidence behind wheatgrass detox claims; ask the health department about rules for Viagra prescriptions; ask for the studies behind treatments for Crohn’s disease, and hundreds more. As a result, claims are being withdrawn and bodies held to account.

This is geeks, working with the public, to park their tanks on the lawn of those who seek to influence us. And it’s starting to work. Come and hear what the campaign is going to do next and how you can get involved.

Leah is a virologist at Birmingham University, trying to work out how virus infected cells cheat death and how blocking these interactions might be used to kill cancer cells. As one of Sense About Science’s Ask for Evidence Ambassadors, she is passionate that science should be for everyone and that Ask for Evidence can help make this happen.

Victoria Stiles

When?
Tuesday, May 9 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Victoria Stiles

What's the talk about?

We’ve reached a situation which shouldn’t have been possible. It is now almost inevitable that the Nazis will appear as a cautionary example in any political discussion and yet this year has seen the rise to prominence of groups which openly share many of their beliefs and even borrow their symbols. It appears that knowing about the past is not the same as learning from history, but is it reasonable to expect history to teach us anything at all?

Victoria Stiles is a freelance researcher and consultant in the field of Modern European History and specialises in the portrayal of imperial history and national stereotypes within Nazi Germany. This year she was called a historian by the LAD Bible, which has more than justified the time she spent getting a PhD. In this talk she will explain some of the ways in which historians use and assess evidence, how they draw parallels between events in different times and places, and how they arrive at an account of the past which they are willing to call “a history”. She is very keen to hear the audience’s thoughts on what they want history and historians to do for them.

Is there anything from our past which can shed light on our current situation? This talk won’t provide all the answers but maybe together we can formulate some better questions.

Timandra Harkness

When?
Tuesday, April 4 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Timandra Harkness

What's the talk about?

Big Data knows where you’ve been and who your friends are. It knows what you like and what makes you angry. It can predict what you’ll buy, where you’ll be the victim of crime and when you’ll have a heart attack. Big Data knows you better than you know yourself, or so it claims.
But how well do you know big data?

From science to smart cities, business to politics, self-quantification to the Internet of Things, people are talking about big data as a force for change Privacy, democracy, even our ideas of who we are, could be transformed. You don’t need to be a Silicon Valley tech prodigy to understand what’s going on.

Timandra Harkness writes comedy, not computer code. The only programs she makes are on the radio. If she can understand what’s going on, so can you. Some of the ideas underlying Big Data are based on the kind of mathematics anybody can grasp: different measures that are correlated in predictable patterns; the relationship between the average of a population and what that tells
you about an individual; how we study networks and connections to learn something new about the big picture. Others, though harder to grasp in theory, are familiar in practice: apps on our  phones that locate us on a map, or count our steps; internet search engines that predict what we’d like to buy; websites that translate other languages into  English.

But big data isn’t just neat mathematics or clever technology. It has implications for all of us.

Timandra asks the big questions about where it’s taking us: is it too big for its boots, or does it think too small? Are you a data point or a human being? She aims to leave you armed and ready to decide what you think about one of the decade’s big ideas: big data.

Paul Duncan McGarrity

When?
Tuesday, March 7 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Paul Duncan McGarrity

What's the talk about?

An archaeologist and comedian (same person, Paul Duncan McGarrity) sits in a room and answers your questions on any subject as honestly as possible. Could be rude, probably crude. Be prepared to talk candidly with the protection of context.

'Like a very tall, funny, excited child' (Scotsman)

Alice Sheppard

When?
Tuesday, February 7 2017 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Alice Sheppard

What's the talk about?

Almost everybody wants to know about space, but while the news is full of it, a lot of the basic science isn't available to those who don't know where to look. This has left the door open for some unpleasant elitism in astronomy and a flood of myths that cloud our perception of the skies. Some of these are harmless fun, some are linked with poor understanding of science, some are potentially harmful and some are just frankly extremely sad.

Alice Sheppard, a long-time space addict and ambassador of citizen science, will take you on a tour of some of our most-misunderstood destinations in the Solar System and beyond, and in ourselves as people and potential astronomers. By the end of the evening, you should feel much more equipped to understand what's beyond our planet, and to get this fascinating area of science moving forward.

Alice Sheppard co-founded Cardiff and Hackney Skeptics in the Pub, ran the Galaxy Zoo forum for five years and has given several SITP talks about astronomy and citizen science. She has a postgraduate diploma in Astrophysics and wrote the chapter on Cecilia Payne for the first Ada Lovelace Day book. She now writes the Citizen Science column at the Society for Popular Astronomy magazine.

On Facebook? Join the Nottingham Skeptics Facebook group for interesting discussions and event invites.

Meirion Jones

When?
Tuesday, January 10 2017 at 7:00PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Meirion Jones

What's the talk about?

NOTE: early start time of 7 pm.

He’s jailed for 10 years now but how did a British conman sell bogus bomb detectors to Iraq for $85 million? A lack of skepticism cost the lives of an estimated 2,000 people in Baghdad. Meirion Jones tells, with the help of video clips and secret recordings, how Jim McCormick and his chums worked the scam around the world and how whistleblowers and a Newsnight team exposed the scandal. This is about multi-million-dollar bribes in Baghdad, and UK PLC turning a blind eye to boost exports, but this is also about the lethal consequences of not basing policy on evidence. Meirion will demonstrate two real bogus bomb detectors as sold by the hoaxers for up to $40,000 each and show you how to make one that works every bit as well for less than a pound.

Meirion Jones is a BBC producer who is in the unusual position of winning the 2013 Scoop of the Year award for a programme which was never broadcast - his exposure of Jimmy Savile as a paedophile. He also won the Daniel Pearl International Award for Investigative Journalism in 2010 for his reports on toxic waste dumping by Trafigura in Africa. He has exposed everything from the fixing of the 2000 US election, to how Britain helped Israel get the atom bomb, from corrupt politicians to the affair of Mark Stone and the undercover cops, as well as homeopaths and healers.

On Facebook? Join the Nottingham Skeptics Facebook group for interesting discussions and event invites.

Stevyn Colgan

When?
Monday, December 5 2016 at 7:30PM

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Where?

48-52 Canal St
Nottingham
NG1 7EH

Who?
Stevyn Colgan

What's the talk about?

Stevyn Colgan has been involved with aliens for three decades. He’s held Jabba the Hutt’s face, helped sculpt creatures for Bruce Willis to shoot at, and had a script accepted for Doctor Who in the 1980s. In this entertaining talk, you’ll hear about feuding gangs of scientists, film directors with less imagination than children, and the perils of concrete poo.

Stevyn Colgan is an author, artist, songwriter, speaker and oddly-spelled Cornishman. He is one of the ‘Elves’ that research and write the popular BBC TV series ‘QI’ and co-writes its sister show, ‘The Museum of Curiosity’, for BBC Radio 4.

On Facebook? Join the Nottingham Skeptics Facebook group for interesting discussions and event invites.